#AnneReadAlong2017 : A Biography of L. M. Montgomery
#AnneReadAlong2017 , Author Spotlight / October 8, 2017

  At this point, we’re just a bit past halfway for #AnneReadAlong2017 !!! Halfway?! That’s craziness. For those of you not following along at home (which, honestly, you all should be. This has been amazing!), Jane @ Greenish Bookshelf and I have been hosting an Anne of Green Gables Read Along. You can learn more about it here. But reaching the halfway point, I realized that we haven’t spent any time talking about the woman behind the book: L.M. Montgomery herself. That seems like a horrendous oversight! So grab a mug of something delicious and follow along as we learn more about L.M. Montgomery’s life and the origin of Anne Shirley. Lucy Maud Montgomery was born on Prince Edward Island, Canada on November 30th, 1874. Her mother died of tuberculosis when she was only 21 months old, and while she still lived with her father for a while, young Montgomery was under the custody of her maternal grandparents. Sadly, her childhood was spent mostly with her strict grandparents and her imaginary friends. There were few children around for Montgomery to socialize with. This period of her life was essential for developing her creativity. It’s obvious that Montgomery’s childhood served as…

Jazz Day: The Making of a Photograph
Book Review / February 6, 2017

Title: Jazz Day: The Making of a Photograph Author: Roxane Orgill Genre: Poetry Publisher: Candlewick Press Release Date: March 6th, 2016 Format: Hardback Pages: 66 Source: Library Illustrator: Francis Vallejo What happens when you invite as many jazz musicians as you can to pose for a photo in 1950s Harlem? Playful verse and glorious artwork capture an iconic moment for American jazz. When Esquire magazine planned an issue to salute the American jazz scene in 1958, graphic designer Art Kane pitched a crazy idea: how about gathering a group of beloved jazz musicians and photographing them? He didn’t own a good camera, didn’t know if any musicians would show up, and insisted on setting up the shoot in front of a Harlem brownstone. Could he pull it off? In a captivating collection of poems, Roxane Orgill steps into the frame of Harlem 1958, bringing to life the musicians’ mischief and quirks, their memorable style, and the vivacious atmosphere of a Harlem block full of kids on a hot summer’s day. Francis Vallejo’s vibrant, detailed, and wonderfully expressive paintings do loving justice to the larger-than-life quality of jazz musicians of the era. Includes bios of several of the fifty-seven musicians, an author’s note, sources, a…

Rad Women Worldwide
Book Review / October 5, 2016

Title: Rad Women Worldwide: Artists, Athletes, Pirates and Punks, and other Revolutionaries Who Shaped History Author: Kate Schatz Genre: Biography Publisher: Ten Speed Press Release Date: September 27th, 2016 Format: Hardback Pages: 112 Source: Owned (Blogging for Books) Illustrator: Miriam Klein Stahl From the authors of the New York Times bestselling book Rad American Women A-Z, comes a bold new collection of 40 biographical profiles, each accompanied by a striking illustrated portrait, showcasing extraordinary women from around the world. Rad Women Worldwide tells fresh, engaging, and inspiring tales of perseverance and radical success by pairing well researched and riveting biographies with powerful and expressive cut-paper portraits. From 430 BCE to 2016, spanning 31 countries around the world, the book features an array of diverse figures, including Hatshepsut (the great female king who ruled Egypt peacefully for two decades) and Malala Yousafzi (the youngest person to win the Nobel Peace Prize) to Poly Styrene (legendary teenage punk and lead singer of X-Ray Spex) and Liv Arnesen and Ann Bancroft (polar explorers and the first women to cross Antarctica). This progressive and visually arresting book is a compelling addition to women’s history and belongs on the shelf of every school, library, and home. Together, these stories…

Mandela: An Audio History
Book Review / August 9, 2016

Title: Mandela: An Audio History Author: Desmond Tutu, Nelson Mandela, Joe Richman and Sue Johnson Genre: Non-Fiction Publisher: HighBridge Company Release Date: February 19th, 2014 Format: Audiobook Pages: 75 (transcript) Source: Library Recognized as one of the most comprehensive oral histories of apartheid ever broadcast (NPR, BBC, CBC, SABC), ” Mandela: An Audio History” tells the story of the struggle against apartheid through rare sound recordings. The series weaves together more than 50 first-person interviews with an unprecedented collection of archival sound: a rare recording of the 1964 trial that resulted in Mandela s life sentence; a visit between Mandela and his family secretly taped by a prison guard; marching songs of guerilla soldiers; government propaganda films; and pirate radio broadcasts from the African National Congress (ANC). Once thought lost forever, Radio Diaries producer Joe Richman unearthed a treasure trove of these historic recordings in the basement archive of the South African Broadcasting Corporation. Ultimately, over 50 hours of archival recordings and many more hours of contemporary interviews with the living witnesses to South Africa s turbulent history have gone into the creation of one of the most moving audio documentaries ever produced. (via Goodreads) Amazon   The drive to…

Midnight in the Garden of Good and Evil
Book Review / July 18, 2016

Title: Midnight in the Garden of Good and Evil Author: John Berendt Genre: True Crime Publisher: Vintage Release Date: June 28th, 1999 Format: Paperback Pages: 386 Source: Owned Shots rang out in Savannah’s grandest mansion in the misty,early morning hours of May 2, 1981. Was it murder or self-defense? For nearly a decade, the shooting and its aftermath reverberated throughout this hauntingly beautiful city of moss-hung oaks and shaded squares. John Berendt’s sharply observed, suspenseful, and witty narrative reads like a thoroughly engrossing novel, and yet it is a work of nonfiction. Berendt skillfully interweaves a hugely entertaining first-person account of life in this isolated remnant of the Old South with the unpredictable twists and turns of a landmark murder case. (via Goodreads) Amazon   My birthday is typically the week after Mother’s Day. This year, instead of gifts (though my Mom cheated and still got me gifts!) we decided to go on a Mother/Daughter trip. My mother has always wanted to visit Savannah, Georgia, but never had the opportunity. A city known for art, history, architecture, and ghosts– it was perfect for us. A place where we could take it easy and never worry about how bored the men…

%d bloggers like this: